Helen Moore



Lecturer
Department of Mathematics
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-2125

Office: 381K, Building 380
Office Phone: 650-724-6597
Dept. Phone: 650-725-6284
Fax: 650-725-4066
E-mail: moore@math.stanford.edu

Stanford Geometry Seminar 2001-2002
Math 20 Course Information (winter 2001-2002 quarter)


Education:

High School Diploma, The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, 1984.
B.S. in Mathematics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1989.
Ph.D. in Mathematics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1995.

Research Interests:

Differential geometry, geometric analysis, minimal surfaces, geometric measure theory, modeling diseases using differential equations, dynamical systems.

Women in Math and Science Links:

Jennifer Gutbezahl: The effect of negative expectations on females' math performance
Achieving gender equity in science classrooms
Facts and figures on women in the sciences
AAUW research on the problems girls face in school
US Dept. of Education resources for increasing women's participation in science
Online Ethics Center info on diversity in science and engineering
Ellen Spertus' page on women and minorities in science and engineering

Other Interests and Interesting Links:

Ultimate frisbee (particularly my team, Ebb and Flow), acoustic guitar, hiking, literature.
A cool video of a sphere turning inside out This is from the Geometry Center, and is a proof by demonstration that a sphere can be turned inside out with no singularities (allowing self-intersection, though!).
Mathematical Careers This site has profiles of people who use a substantial amount of mathematics in their jobs. Included are people in cancer research, computing, environmental clean-up, financial planning, military defense, the oil industry, and lots of other businesses. The site is searchable by keyword, which means that you can type in a job or career that interests you, and get a list of all the profiles related to that topic.
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU's): This is a list of summer research programs in mathematics for undergraduates. The programs last from five to eleven weeks, and there are a variety of math topics offered at schools across the country. If you are admitted, you will get paid to do math.



Go to:
Mathematics Department
Stanford University Mathematics Organization
Stanford University
Project NExT, New Experiences in Teaching
The American Mathematical Society
The Association for Women in Mathematics
The Association for Women in Science

Last modified: Thu Jan 10 18:19:42 PST 2002